Kudzu Recovery Herb - Alcohol Abuse, Side Effects, Sugar, Syndrome

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Kudzu Recovery Herb - Alcohol Abuse, Side Effects, Sugar, Syndrome
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Kudzu Recovery Herb - Alcohol Abuse, Side Effects, Sugar, Syndrome

For people drinking too much alcohol (abuse, binging), research has uncovered a possible helpful agent with positive side effects.

Kudzu, the common name for Radix puerariae, was shown in a study to suppress alcohol intake in hamsters.  Other tests were conducted to demonstrate that hamsters would be a reliable indicator of comparable effects in humans and were found to be similar.  The chemical compounds responsible for the positive side effects were isoflavones.  These isoflavones (which are similar to bioflavonoids) support blood vessels and help with circulation.  In addition, kudzu is expected to support muscle relaxation.

As reported by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kudzu, may result in a significant reduction in the number of alcohol drinks consumed by subjects.

In a study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, published in the May 2005 issue, people who took kudzu drank an average of 1.8 beers per session, compared with 3.5 beers consumed by those who took a placebo.

Researcher, Scott Lukas, did not have any trouble rounding up volunteers for his study.  Lukas's team at Harvard-affiliated McLean Hospital set up a makeshift "apartment" in a laboratory, complete with a television, reclining chair and a refrigerator stocked with beer.

Lukas was not certain why, but speculated that kudzu increases blood alcohol levels and speeds up its effects.  More simply put, the subjects needed fewer beers to feel drunk.  "That rapid infusion of alcohol is satisfying them and taking away their desire for more drinks," Lukas said.  "That's only a theory.  It's the best we've got so far."

 

Kudzu Recovery Herb - Alcohol Abuse, Effects, Sugar, Syndrome

This abandoned cabin is tucked back in the woods and even though it is visible from the highway it is hardly noticeable. There are many such houses which lie in the path of the ever spreading kudzu vine.  Picture used by permission from Jack Anthony.

How the Herb Kudzu Works
Researchers believe it may be the isoflavones in kudzu that reduce the craving for alcohol.  The isoflavones in kudzu belong to a larger chemical group known as phyto-estrogens (similar to bioflavonoids).  In addition, early results from animal studies suggest kudzu phytoestrogens may also help to protect against bone loss and may help relieve the negative side effects associated with hot flashes in menopausal women.

In addition to its effects on alcohol, kudzu is a popular herb for supporting blood sugar balance and liver function.  Kudzu may help reduce the number of drinks consumed and the syndrome associated with binge drinking.

Also, Dr. David Overstreet's (Professor at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) studies show that kudzu may reduce drinking in humans.  He has been researching kudzu for many years.  While it can't promise to make you quit drinking overnight, kudzu may be an effective part of a program to reduce your total alcohol intake.

Kudzu root has been used by Asian cultures for over 1000 years.  Uses range from flu support to helping people cut-back on alcohol to use as a thickening agent for soups.   This vine which now grows rampant in the southern part of the USA was also used to control erosion, a decorative trellis plant, and for hay and fodder.  Despite its myriad of uses and positive side effects, the vine is generally regarded as a problem plant in the United States.

Editors Note:  Additional considerations are to use kudzu and d,l phenylalanine in association with l-glutamine for lessening the desire for alcohol and carbohydrates.  Lithium orotate also shows promise in this arena along with n-acetyl l-cysteine (NAC) for other behavior support.  There seems to be a synergistic relationship with all of these combined compared to any one single nutrient alone.  In addition, activated charcoal/bentonite clay is the preferred choice for detoxification of toxic substances and other poisons that can build-up in our bodies.

Anti-Alcohol Antioxidants, and silymarin (milk thistle) extract are additional considerations.

Warnings Information:

  • For dietary supplement use only,

  • Keep out of reach of children,

  • Do not exceed recommended dosage,

  • If you have a bad reaction or negative side effects, discontinue use immediately,

  • When using, please inform your physician,

  • If you are pregnant, lactating or have a medical condition, consult your health care professional before using this or any other nutritional supplement -- particularly if you are one who is prone to abuse alcohol which can lead to fetal alcohol syndrome,

  • If the side effects of allergic reaction occur, discontinue using Kudzu Herb Supplements - vine, plant, seed, extract immediately.

Kudzu Recovery - Ingredients/Dose

Pricing Information: Kudzu Herb Supplements | Anti-Alcohol Antioxidants / Silymarin (Milk Thistle) Extract | L-Glutamine |
Lithium Orotate | N-Acetyl L-Cysteine

 

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